geta (made of wood) to zori (bottom) and waraji bottom right). As the above photo clearly shows, there is a large number of styles, depending on the wearer and the usage. Japanese footwear allows free circulation of air around the feet, making it perfect for the hot humid summers of Japan, although a bit cold in winter… The high teeth (歯 ha) of the geta kept the wearer’s feet clean during a rainy day on Japan’s notoriously muddy roads." />

OLD PHOTOS of JAPAN, a photo blog of Japan in the Meiji, Taisho and Showa periods

Old Photos of Japan
shows photos of Japan between the 1860s and 1930s. In 1854, Japan opened its doors to the outside world for the first time in more than 200 years. It set in motion a truly astounding transformation. As fate would have it, photography had just been invented. As the old country vanished and a new one was born, daring photographers took photos. Discover what life was like with their rare and precious photographs of old Japan.
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  • Kjeld Duits

    These were worn all year through, but in the colder places of Japan they also …

  • Sophia

    Did they have to wear those in Winter also? :o

1890s • Japanese Footwear

Japanese Footwear

A selection of Japanese footwear ranging from geta (made of wood) to zori (bottom) and waraji bottom right). As the above photo clearly shows, there is a large number of styles, depending on the wearer and the usage. Japanese footwear allows free circulation of air around the feet, making it perfect for the hot humid summers of Japan, although a bit cold in winter… The high teeth (歯 ha) of the geta kept the wearer’s feet clean during a rainy day on Japan’s notoriously muddy roads.

Although geta and zori had lost much of their popularity after the end of WWII, young people rediscovered them in the mid 1990’s with the new popularity of yukata (cotton summer kimono). The yukata boom came as famous Japanese fashion brands like Kansai Yamamoto, Junko Koshino, Junko Shimada, Comme des Garçons and others threw out the traditional patterns and created beautiful new designs that attracted modern urban youths.

Photographer: Unknown
Publisher: Unknown
Medium: Albumen Print
Image Number 70614-0011

Quote this number when you contact us about licensing this image.
You can also licence this image online: 70614-0011 @ MeijiShowa.com.

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Posted by • 2008-06-17
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Did they have to wear those in Winter also? :o

# Sophia · 2008-07-20

These were worn all year through, but in the colder places of Japan they also wore tabi (socks) and in case of snow a sort of snow shoes made of straw. At the time this photograph was taken such places were still barely visited by foreigners, though. So they wouldn’t have seen them.

# Kjeld Duits · 2008-07-20








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