OLD PHOTOS of JAPAN, a photo blog of Japan in the Meiji, Taisho and Showa periods

Old Photos of Japan
shows photos of Japan between the 1860s and 1930s. In 1854, Japan opened its doors to the outside world for the first time in more than 200 years. It set in motion a truly astounding transformation. As fate would have it, photography had just been invented. As the old country vanished and a new one was born, daring photographers took photos. Discover what life was like with their rare and precious photographs of old Japan.
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Photography in Japan 1853-1912 • Terry Bennett
Photography in Japan

Terry Bennett has been researching 19th century Japanese photography for over 25 years. In this masterpiece he tells us the story of photography in Japan, using 350 rare images. All the known photographers are introduced with details that you will have trouble finding anywhere else. THE best book about early Japanese photography.


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Kobe, 1906 • New Year Celebrations 6

New Year Celebrations

A housewife shops for a plant during the preparations for New Year. This image is part of The New Year in Japan, a book published by Kobe-based photographer Kozaburo Tamamura in 1906. Click on Read Full Article to read the original text that accompanied this image.

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Kobe, 1906 • New Year Celebrations 7

New Year Celebrations

Eating soba, still a part of ringing out the old year in Japan today. This image is part of The New Year in Japan, a book published by Kobe-based photographer Kozaburo Tamamura in 1906. Click on Read Full Article to read the original text that accompanied this image.

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Kobe, 1906 • New Year Celebrations 8

New Year Celebrations

Kadomatsu (door pine) is a decoration for Japanese New Year. Kadomatsu are displayed next to the entrance during the first week of the year. The pine represents continuity, the bamboo straightness and sincerity. Kadomatsu can be seen all over Japan, except near Ikuta Jinja in Kobe. Reportedly because the kami of the shrine showed his dislike of kadomatsu by washing the ones near the shrine away during a flood in the eighth century. This image is part of The New Year in Japan, a book published by Kobe-based photographer Kozaburo Tamamura in 1906. Click on Read Full Article to read the original text that accompanied this image.

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Kobe, 1906 • New Year Celebrations 9

New Year Celebrations

The first meal of the year, includes a soup called zoni, which features mochi, seen being made in New Year Celebrations 2. This image is part of The New Year in Japan, a book published by Kobe-based photographer Kozaburo Tamamura in 1906. Click on Read Full Article to read the original text that accompanied this image.

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