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The "Human Horses" of the Rickshaw

(Author)

@Glennis: The connection with left side driving was a new discovery for me as well. I had never seen it mentioned in popular articles. Shows again how important it is to check scholarly and primary sources.

Did you know that the United States Postal Service used three wheeled vehicles? I came across photographs in my research. They were used in the 1950s and 1960s.

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Interesting about left side driving! I did not know that connection. The only places I’ve recently seen the jinrikisha are in Kamakura and Kyoto- of course high tourist destinations.
The three wheeled vehicles are still everywhere and and are so practical! I wish they were popular in US urban areas.

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Ruins of the American Legation

@glennis: I wonder if the silks survived the rough handling during the fire. In his first letter, Pruyn wrote that many of the items were thrown in the pond to protect them from the flames, including the books and even boxes with paper money… As the samurai were familiar with silk, I would like to think they did not throw these in the pond as well!

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a great and focused history lesson that tells us a lot about the culture of the time as well. You know I would be interested in the packing up of the silks! My next walk through the port area of Yokohama I will be reminded of this violent period in that area. Fascinating!

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Your article solves a mystery for me. We participated in our Nagano community’s sports day, where the various subsections of town have teams of adults competing in games. At one point, everyone got on the field for calisthenics and seemed to magically know what exercise was next, while we randomly flailed around trying to keep up and blend in. Now I even have a video to practice for this summer. Brilliant, thanks!

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"The Rice in Japan"

@Hans Brinckmann: Dank je Hans! Ja, de passie voor geschiedenis, Japan, schrijven en oude foto’s brand heftig door ❤️

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Geweldig, Kjeld! Je passie voor oude foto’s is nog steeds levend!
Hans

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Running the Mail

(Author)

@Ted Taylor Thanks for sharing the clip. I noticed your comment after I posted mine, so changed it.

It seems there is quite a discussion still going on about nanba bashiri. I just tried walking with an ipsilateral gait a little, and I think it would actually make it easier to carry a pole with a load at the end.

I also noticed that Kono-sensei bent his knees in his demonstration. Interestingly, German diplomat Lindau specifically mentioned the bent knees of the hikyaku in the description that I quoted in the article…

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(Author)

The term Nanba bashiri (ナンバ走り) was apparently made popular by ancient martial arts researcher Yoshihiko Yano (矢野龍彦).

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Yet another terrific post. In a martial arts seminar held two decades back in Chiba, Kono Yoshinori held a lecture/practical on that ipsilateral gait, known as “namba aruki.” So it was indeed a thing.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DC66NZj8pJ4

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How do you Wash a Kimono?

(Author)

@glennis: Glad that my article contained new information!

Although it is very posed, and shot in the studio with a model, I love the postcard with the washboard.

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Feeding Silkworms

(Author)

@glennis: That information about the ash actually comes from the back of the stereoview. I did a quick search, but couldn’t find any information right away about what silkworms were fed in their first of five stages. Will research this when I write about sericulture again!

I also love Unbeaten Tracks. Lots of beautiful descriptions, Bird was very observant.

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Maiko at Japanese Garden

(Author)

@glennis: Yes, I should do something about Sankeien. I only have one image of the garden right now. Will have to find a few more!

Cool, that your classmate’s family owned the garden.

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i clicked here to see if this was Sankeien. Too bad this was destroyed. You might consider Sankeien as a topic some time. My Saint Maur classmate’s family was the owner of Sankeien which was also connected to the silk industry. (wasn’t everything?) Beautiful. Went there many times as a child and even recently. It was not far from our house in Negishi/Yamate area

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i never heard of feeding silkworms on the ash of mulberry leaves. Is there a citation for this? Seems a little contrary to nature as the caterpillars get all their water/hydration from the leaves and ash would not provide this. Maybe a translation thing. I’ve seen lots of weird translation issues in regards to sericulture. There are two great museums for silk- the Silk Center in Yokohama and the newly reconstructed one in Okayama.

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Ebisu Shrine and Harbor

(Author)

@Noel: You are right. Just made a comparison with other Nagasaki images shot by Tamamura and the font for Nagasaki is identical. Yes, seeing the changes over time is very interesting and helpful. I try to build on that with my own photographs.

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The artist is “unknown”, but isn’t that a Tamamura Kozaburo’s signature caption/ label?
Thanks to the fact that Meiji photographers used to take multiple shots of the same locations we can see how certain places changed and evolved through the decades.

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