OLD PHOTOS of JAPAN, a photo blog of Japan in the Meiji, Taisho and Showa periods

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Old Photos of Japan
shows photos of Japan between the 1860s and 1930s. In 1854, Japan opened its doors to the outside world for the first time in more than 200 years. It set in motion a truly astounding transformation. As fate would have it, photography had just been invented. As the old country vanished and a new one was born, daring photographers took photos. Discover what life was like with their rare and precious photographs of old Japan.
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Recent Comments  
  • Technic

    Good post. Thanks.

  • Kjeld Duits

    You are very welcome. Thanks for the nice words about Old Photos of Japan and …

  • kelly

    Kjeld: thanks so much for researching that for me! Actually, by your post I was …

  • Kjeld Duits

    Have you already done a search on Google? I got more than 17,000 hits with …

  • kelly

    I’m intrigued by the formal kimonos. I have one my grandfather brought back from Okinawa …

1920s • Bride and Groom

Wedding Portrait of Japanese Couple

In this beautiful wedding portrait, the groom wears a Western suit, while the bride is clad in a gorgeously decorated wedding kimono. For more information about Japanese wedding customs, see 1920s • Bride and Groom.

Photographer: Unknown
Publisher: Unknown
Medium: Silver Gelatin Print
Image Number 70223-0002

Quote this number when you contact us about licensing this image.
You can also licence this image online: 70223-0002 @ MeijiShowa.com.

IMPORTANT
Usage of this image requires a reproduction fee.
Posted by • 2008-12-20
Add Comment

She looks beautiful in her kimono. The man does not look right in the western suit. He would have looked better in a kimono.

# Tornadoes28 · 2008-12-21

Interesting you should say that. The modern black formal kimono, with its striped hakama, clearly draws its inspiration from Western morning dress, as in this picture. What’s interesting to me is that you usually don’t see this anymore: either both are wearing kimono (as in the kamimae-shiki), or both are wearing Western wedding attire (in a Christian or secular ceremony). Mixed Western- and Japanese attire is only seen at things like university graduations and Coming-of-Age Day.

# *shrug* · 2009-04-19

Shinzen-shiki, rather. (Ah, the wonders of multiple kanji readings.) And I guess HTML doesn’t work on this site.

# *shrug* · 2009-04-19

Hi shrug,

Yes, html doesn’t work. The site uses something called textile. Click Formatting Help for details.

# Kjeld Duits · 2009-04-19

I’m intrigued by the formal kimonos. I have one my grandfather brought back from Okinawa after World War 2. We have no idea how old it is, but the woman’s above is the closest thing I have ever seen to it. Do you, or do any readers have any idea how I can find out more about this precious family heirloom? Thanks!

# kelly · 2009-05-28

Have you already done a search on Google? I got more than 17,000 hits with this search.

# Kjeld Duits · 2009-05-28

Kjeld: thanks so much for researching that for me! Actually, by your post I was able to find out it was a wedding kimono….so now I have a starting place! I’ll keep visiting; I love your gorgeous blog! Thanks! kel

# kelly · 2009-05-29

You are very welcome. Thanks for the nice words about Old Photos of Japan and hope to see a lot of you!

# Kjeld Duits · 2009-05-29

Good post. Thanks.

# Technic · 2014-12-02








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